A Question for My U.K. Readers On a Post I Wrote About Marigold Churchill

A little over 2 years ago, in the summer of 2014, I read William Manchester’s 3-volume biography of Winston Churchill. While reading that biography, I wrote a post titled, “The Death of Marigold Churchill” in which I described how reading about the Churchill’s daughter’s death at nearly 3 years old affected me. I wrote,

Today, while on my morning walk, Churchill’s youngest daughter (at the time), died. Marigold Churchill was 2 years and 9 months old at the time of her death, and the descriptions of the scene, with her asking her mother to sing the popular tune “Bubbles” to her, brought a flood of tears to my eyes, making it almost dangerous to continue walking.

Now, most posts like this get some views for a day, maybe a week, and then vanish into the noise. After all, with nearly 6,100 posts, not much stands out.

But this one has been different. This one frequently appears at the top of the list for a given day, and sometimes, spikes remarkable high. Here is a history of the views of this post over the last two years.

Stats for Marigold Churchill Post

Take note of February, March, and September 2016. There were thousands of views of this post each of those months. And while 2016 is not quite over, there have been over 10,000 views of the post just this year alone.

A large portion of these views appear to come from the U.K. I was wondering if any of my U.K. readers could explain the strange popularity of this post. It is definitely an unusual volume of views for a post I’ve written on something that I’ve read.

If you have any ideas, drop them in the comments. I’m honestly curious.

2 thoughts on “A Question for My U.K. Readers On a Post I Wrote About Marigold Churchill

  1. My first guess is that there is a school in the U.K. where they teach about her during those periods of the year. I have a few *very old* posts that keep doing better than they really should and it’s 100% correlated to a university’s curriculum.

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