Short fiction I read in April 2012

April was not a good month for short fiction. The stories were great, but I didn’t have time to read many. This was, in part, due to the fact that I spent much of April doing my annual reading of Isaac Asimov’s autobiography. Between that and the reading I do for my Vacation in the Golden Age, there simply wasn’t any time left over. Here is the short fiction I read in April:

  1. Heritage by Robert Abernathy (Astounding, June 1942). [4/1/2012]
  2. This Rough Magic by Christie Yant (Daily SF, 4/3/12). [4/3/12]
  3. Secret Unattainable by A. E. van Vogt (Astounding, July 1942). [4/4/2012]
  4. Brimstone Bill by Malcolm Jameson (Astounding, July 1942). [4/8/2012]
  5. The Contraband Cow by L. Sprague de Camp (Astounding, July 1942). [4/8/2012]
  6. Waiting at the Alter by Jack McDevitt (Asimov’s, June 2012). [4/25/2012]
  7. Robot Dreams by Isaac Asimov [4/26/2012]
  8. Penance Cruise by David V. Reed (Astounding, July 1942). [4/27/2012]
  9. Space Can by L. Ron Hubbard (Astounding, July 1942) [4/27/2012]
  10. Collision Orbit by Jack Williamson (as by Will Stewart) (Astounding, July 1942) [4/28/2012]
  11. The Strange Case of the Missing Hero by Frank Holby (Astounding, July 1942) [4/28/2012]
  12. De Gustibus by Randall Hale (Astounding, July 1942) [4/28/2012]
  13. The Mysterious Bomb Raid by Bob Tucker (Astounding, July 1942) [4/29/2012]
  14. About Quarrels, About the Past by John Pierce (Astounding, July 1942) [4/29/2012]
  15. The Qwerty of Hrothgar by Creighton Buck (Astounding, July 1942) [4/29/2012]
  16. Eat, Drink and Be Wary by Ray Bradbury (Astounding, July 1942) [4/29/2012]
  17. The Floater by Sheldon G. Thomas (Astounding, July 1942) [4/29/2012]
  18. Tools by Clifford D. Simak (Astounding, July 1942) [4/29/2012]

And as always, if you are looking for inexpensive entertainment, a subscription to one of the many terrific science fiction and fantasy magazines out there is cheaper than an evening out at the movies.

Published by Jamie Todd Rubin

Jamie Todd Rubin writes fiction and nonfiction for a variety of publications including Analog, Clarkesworld, The Daily Beast, 99U, Daily Science Fiction, Lightspeed, InterGalactic Medicine Show, and several anthologies. He was featured in Lifehacker’s How I Work series. He has been blogging since 2005. By day, he manages software projects and occasionally writes code. He lives in Falls Church, Virginia with his wife and three children. Find him on Twitter at @jamietr.