Tag Archives: churches

Back from Pittsburgh

I have been in Pittsburgh for work since Tuesday. My days have been long (between 12-13-1/2 hours a day) and I haven’t had any time to write here. I got back home late yesterday afternoon, and was so sleep-deprived that I was completely out-of-sorts. After a good night’s sleep, however, I am feeling back to myself again. I noticed that Kelly has the new house looking completely unpacked and setup. All that’s left to unpack is the other half of my office.

I had a view of this church during my stay in Pittsburgh this week. I desperately wanted to get to a game at PNC Park. Wednesday looked like the prime night, but I ended up working late. When I got to the hotel restaurant, the Pirates were losing 7-1. But they came back and won 8-7 so that would have been quite a game to be at.

There is also a small bookstore that I meant to get to around the corner from where I was working–Desolation Books. I didn’t make it there this time, but hope to get back there the next time I am in town.

Church signs, part 2

Okay, so I was so curious about this church sign phenomenon that I spent some time browsing and found a sign that stopped me in my tracks.

This makes no sense to me. In fact, I think the sign should read the opposite: Reason is the greatest ally that faith has. It seems simple to me. If human beings couldn’t reason, if they couldn’t have made logical connections between things, then humanity would have died off long ago. And since faith requires people, without humanity, no faith. Clearly, then, the only reason faith exists is due to the fact that reason has allowed it to exist. It took reasoning to learn how to handle fire; it took reasoning to learn how to conquer disease. These things have allowed people to survive and become what they are today. How in the world can reason be the greatest enemy faith has?

Of course, I’m just being reasonable, so what do I know.

Church signs

What’s up with church signs? It seems that the signs outside of most churches try to present some kind of important moral message to people, which is a good and noble thing. But why do the people who come up with the signs think that they all need to be clever in order for the message to get through. Is this something that I have just now been noticing or has this been going on for some time now? I suspect it has based on a quick Google search I just did.

Case in point: there is a church not too far from my house with the following sign out front:

REMAIN IN THE SON TO KEEP FROM BURNING

I’ll admit, it’s clever. (Although I will also point out that Shakespeare was there first: remember from Hamlet: “Not so my lord, I am too much in the son.”) But why do moral messages have to be clever in the first place? Why can’t they just give simple, direct message?

If I ran a church, here are the signs that I would put up:

BE NICE TO OTHERS
DON’T RUN STOP SIGNS
READ TO YOUR KIDS
YOU SHOULD BE PAYING ATTENTION TO THE ROAD INSTEAD OF READING THIS SIGN

But what do I know about this kind of thing.