A Developer’s Logbook

Working scientists use logbooks to record their work so that they can (a) reproduce results, and (b) establish priority in discoveries. As a working developer, I use a logbook, too, which also serves two primary purposes: (a) capture what I did during the day (sometimes in order to reproduce things), and (b) as an index to more detailed notes for specific things.

My logbook had evolved over the years. It’s present incarnation is a text (markdown) file in Obsidian. For work, I use Obsidian’s Daily Note feature for my logbook. I have one logbook “page” for each day. I have this logbook page open on one screen at all times. Usually my Obsidian window is split with my logbook on the left and other notes files on the right. Here is what a typical screen looks like:

My screen with my logbook and other notes open in Obsidian

Yesterday I mentioned how I was in crunch time for a software system my team has been building for the last 13 months. We go-live on Monday and we are preparing for roll out. We are in what I call the “junk drawer” phase of the project. I think of it like moving houses. All of the big furniture had been moved and all that is left is the stuff in the closets and junk drawers. That’s where we are. Yesterday, my workday started at 7am and ended at 12:30 am (this morning!). Here is my logbook entry for yesterday:

Yesterday's page from my logbook

Those of you who spend your days making software are probably familiar with the pattern of these last few days before roll out. Those who aren’t can at least get a little glimpse of what these days are like for me.

As you can see from the logbook, I finally got to bed around 1 am (about 4 hours later than normal) and I was up before six this morning so that I could get in my morning walk before taking my girls to school and writing this post.

Now it’s back to where I left off yesterday. I have a new blank “page” open in my logbook and I’m ready to fill it.

About Jamie Todd Rubin

Jamie Todd Rubin writes fiction and nonfiction for a variety of publications including Analog, Clarkesworld, The Daily Beast, 99U, Daily Science Fiction, Lightspeed, InterGalactic Medicine Show, and several anthologies. He was featured in Lifehacker’s How I Work series. He has been blogging since 2005. By day, he manages software projects and occasionally writes code. He lives in Arlington, Virginia with his wife and three children. Find him on Twitter at @jamietr.

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