W. C. Heinz and the M*A*S*H Connection

I have mentioned before how my favorite long-form nonfiction is the baseball essay. Reading those essays leads to all kinds of places. I was discussing these types of pieces with a friend of mine, and he recommended a recent book put out through The Library of America called The Top of His Game: The Best Sportswriting of W. C. Heinz edited by Bill Littlefield. I’d never read any of Heinz’s pieces before, but I am having a delightful time going through this book. His pieces tend to be short: 800 words, compared the the baseball essays that I most enjoy. But Heinz’s voice carries the day in these pieces, which cover all manner of sports, from baseball, to boxing, or horse-racing, and beyond.

But the most remarkable thing I’ve learned in this book is something about Heinz himself. I am also a big fan of M*A*S*H. The book, upon which both the movie and the series was based, was written by Richard Hooker. Well, it turns out that Richard Hooker is a pseudonym for pair of writers. One is H. Richard Hornberger, a doctor who served in Korea. The other writer was–you guessed it–W. C. Heinz.

I thought that was a pretty cool connection, when I learned of it in the intro to the book.

Published by Jamie Todd Rubin

Jamie Todd Rubin writes fiction and nonfiction for a variety of publications including Analog, Clarkesworld, The Daily Beast, 99U, Daily Science Fiction, Lightspeed, InterGalactic Medicine Show, and several anthologies. He was featured in Lifehacker’s How I Work series. He has been blogging since 2005. By day, he manages software projects and occasionally writes code. He lives in Falls Church, Virginia with his wife and three children. Find him on Twitter at @jamietr.