Evernote

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I am beginning to play around with Evernote as a tool to store all of my notes and to-do lists in the cloud and have everything easily searchable and at my fingertips no matter where I am. So far, I’m pretty impressed, and it’s no surprise, since Evernote was one of the 25 best applications in MacWorld this year.  (Scrivener 2.0 was another.) A while back I mentioned how I have gone paperless at work and in 2011, I plan on doing the same at home. Evernote Premium (which is what I am using) goes a long way to making this possible. I can upload PDFs and their content is searchable, even if the notes in them are handwritten. I can tag notes and provide all kinds of meta-data to improve the searching. I can clip articles from the web and store them. There are lots of nice features and plug-ins. I’m still in the early experimental stages but once I get going with this, I’ll let you know how it turns out.

Published by Jamie Todd Rubin

Jamie Todd Rubin writes fiction and nonfiction for a variety of publications including Analog, Clarkesworld, The Daily Beast, 99U, Daily Science Fiction, Lightspeed, InterGalactic Medicine Show, and several anthologies. He was featured in Lifehacker’s How I Work series. He has been blogging since 2005. By day, he manages software projects and occasionally writes code. He lives in Falls Church, Virginia with his wife and three children. Find him on Twitter at @jamietr.

2 replies on “Evernote”

  1. Michael, thanks for the link. It looks like a good service, but it doesn’t have some of the functionality I found in Evernote. For instance, I can upload all kinds of file types and for some, like PDFs, those files will be searchable, even if they are handwritten. So I can scan my contracts and receipts to PDF and upload them, tag them, and then be able to search them. Evernote has a pretty nice iPhone app, too, and the basic service is free. The premium service is $45/year and includes 0.5TB of upload/storage per month.

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