Writing “two thousand seven”

Until this post, four days into the new year, I have not had to write 2007 yet. This is an interesting phenomenon to me because ten years ago, I would have been paying the rent on January 1, 1997, and it would have been the first time I had to write 2007 on a check. But I don’t write checks anymore; my bill pay service handles it for me. I have not had to sign and date anything yet this year either. It used to be that for the first few weeks of the year, whenever I had to write the date, I would always write down the previous year, or as we say in the programming world: year–. But with so much more of what we do happening in the electronic world, I find myself having to write the date less and less. It certainly limits the opportunity for mistakes, but on the other hand, because I don’t write the year as much, I tend to forget what year I am in when I do have to write the year. (Remember back in school when just about every we were writing the date in the upper-right corner of our notes. You never forgot what year you were in back then!)

Even though I see the year on calendars, and on the date stamps on these blog entries, it doesn’t feel like 2007 until I start writing it. I guess I have some catching up to do: 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007, 2007…

Published by Jamie Todd Rubin

Jamie Todd Rubin writes fiction and nonfiction for a variety of publications including Analog, Clarkesworld, The Daily Beast, 99U, Daily Science Fiction, Lightspeed, InterGalactic Medicine Show, and several anthologies. He was featured in Lifehacker’s How I Work series. He has been blogging since 2005. By day, he manages software projects and occasionally writes code. He lives in Falls Church, Virginia with his wife and three children. Find him on Twitter at @jamietr.