Tag Archives: productivity

6 Tips and Tricks for How I Stay at Inbox Zero

Recently, I’ve gotten pretty good about keeping my inbox down to zero. I found that, for me, it takes a pinch of discipline and a couple of good tools. I figured I’d share my tips in case anyone else found them handy.

2 minute rule with Boomerang/Mailbox

For almost 2 years now, I’ve used the Boomerang plugin for Gmail and that plugin has been a game-changer. Boomerang does 3 things that I find really useful:

  • It allows you to “boomerang” a message until later. That it, it moves the message out of your inbox and returns it there at a designated time, tomorrow morning, two days from now, on the weekend, next week, or whenever you specific.
  • It allows you to send a message, and then boomerangs your message back into your inbox if you haven’t gotten a response after a certain time interval. So I don’t have remember to follow up with someone.
  • It allows me to schedule email messages.

I use Boomerang in conjunction with the “2-minute” rule. When an email comes in, if I can answer it in less than 2 minutes, I do it right away. If it will take longer, I’ll boomerang the message to a later time, either later in the evening, the next day, or the weekend, depending on the urgency.

To aid in this, Boomerang has an intelligent feature that looks for dates in the message. So if the message says, “RSVP by 10/15/2014” Boomerang will automatically suggest that (or a week before that date) to return the message to my inbox, which saves me a step.

When I’m working on my iPhone, I manage my email using an app called Mailbox, which has much of the same functionality as Boomerang, but is conveniently available on the phone, so I can manage my inbox the same way there.

Gmail canned responses

I’ve been able to reply to a lot more message in under 2 minutes by taking advantage of Gmail’s “Canned Response” feature. This feature allows you to write canned responses that you can quickly insert into email messages. I’d say that about 10% of the email I send are canned responses. By far the two most common are inquiries for people wanting to do guest posts on my blog, or advertise on my blog.

For these, all I have to do is select the appropriate canned response template in Gmail and click send.

Canned Responses

TextExpander expansions

I am a big fan of TextExpander and I use it all over the place. (On Windows, I use a similar tool called Phrase Express.) TextExpander allows you to create shortcuts to text snippets and other things. This can be formatted text, and can include some cool functionality like inserting dates, and other things.

For email, I tend to you TextExpander to speed up replies, and to prevent myself from having to lookup information. For instance, if I am referring someone to a common link on my website (say, my Going Paperless posts), rather than having to remember the link and type it in (and worry about making a typo) all I do is type

xpaperless

which automatically turns into

http://www.jamierubin.net/going-paperless/

I can never remember my home phone number, so if I’m sending that via email I have a shortcut for that. I have shortcuts for all kinds of common information like my address, or website, or bibliography page. I usually create a shortcut that links to the most recent article I’ve published.

All of these speed up the process of replying to email, and help make it possible to respond in under 2 minutes.

Turn off social media notifications

One thing I did that helped a lot was to turn off all social media email notifications. Rather than have that information pushed to me via email, I pull it when I need it by checking Twitter or Facebook periodically. This eliminated a ton of email from my inbox, and for each message, eliminated the step of having to delete the email.

Filter receipts and confirmations

I make heavy use to Gmail’s filtering to deal with a lot of email. Regular bill notification and automatic payment notifications are automatically filtered without ever going into my inbox.

Receipts and confirmation emails are also filtered without ever seeing my inbox. For these, I go one step further and have them sent to my Evernote email account so that I have the receipt and confirmations in Evernote. This is automated, so not only do these messages not clutter my email inbox, but they also get into Evernote automatically.

Unsubscribing

I’ve become a big unsubscriber lately, and while it took a while for me to see the overall result, I can see now that it prevents a lot of email that would go unread or get deleted from ever coming into my inbox.


Do you tips for how you stay at inbox zero? Leave them in the comments.

An engine of productivity

jkashlock mentioned how today is a bust as far as work is concerned. It made me wonder just how much productivity is lost on a day like today. It’s not that there are a lot of people who take the day off, and so productivity falls; I’m talking about lost productivity. The people who do go into work on a day like today can’t be nearly as productive as they would normally be. Personally, I have trouble focusing on a day like today. I’m sure there are people who do get things done, even if it’s as simple as getting a desk cleaned off, or emptying an Outlook inbox. Still, there has to be tremendous productivity losses. Everyone who remains at work is thinking about their long weekend, or the lines at the airport that they have to face. Or ways to sneak out of the office early.

Well, it’s lunchtime. I’m off to my regularly scheduled noontime nap. There is nothing special about that loss of productivity. It happens every day.

In the department of “you know it’s bad when…”

You know it’s bad at work when you can’t get anyone on the phone. Unless it’s a meeting that has been planned ahead of time, you can call as many people as you want–pick five randomly–and the phone wil ring and ring and you’ll be lucky to get a call back sometime weeks in the future.

So what has the smart phone and Blackberry and all of these other gadgets done for us? Apparently they have made us so productive that we don’t have time to actually use the device anymore.

I don’t know about you but this is what it has been like at my work for months and months now and it’s getting worse. I’ve taken to leaving joking messages on people’s voicemail, threatening them with shorter work hours unless they call me back. Everyone is just so busy. I don’t get it. If I get too busy, I can’t process what I am doing and usually end up being completely unproductive. So I try and maintain a reasonable level of busyness.

I don’t know how everyone else manages.